Fall Butternut Squash, Kale, and Cranberry Curry with Apple Quinoa

Use fall ingredients like butternut squash, cranberries, and apples to make this easy, comforting curry.

Every November, a heap of pretty butternut squashes lie untouched on my kitchen counter like forgotten children. As the seasons’ colors change from autumn orange to holiday red, they sit – ignored – until finally, I toss them into our compost heap.

In a flurry of October excitement, with the fresh outlook that only autumn brings me, I buy the squashes with the best of intentions. In the store gazing at the abundant gourds – so symbolic of fall’s arrival – I envision myself cooking away the weekends without a care in the world: butternut soup, butternut gnocchi, butternut ravioli – the scent of butter and sage wafting through the house, the exotic sounds of Spanish guitar playing over Alexa’s speaker. So much potential. 

But each weekend brings a longer to-do list that never makes space for my ambitious from-scratch kitchen plans. After a few rushed dinners, I tire of Instant Pot butternut squash soup. Not knowing what else to make with them, the squashes rot and – with a pang of guilt that reminds me I shouldn’t buy what I can’t use – into the compost I throw them. (Can you tell meal planning and organization aren’t my forte?)

Between grocery store trips and CSA hauls, I’ve had three butternut squashes sitting on my counter for the past couple weeks. This year, though – I was determined to use them. In my quest to waste less, I decided I needed to give butternut squash a makeover and come up with something new to do with them – something new to my family at least. Something fresh. But fast. 

That’s where this recipe comes in. For the past few years, the now-tattered and food-splattered pages of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg’s Flavor Bible has given me a lot of creative ideas when I’m not sure what to do with the ingredients in my kitchen. The book includes an alphabetical listing of almost any food you can think of followed by a list of ingredients and flavors that pair well with that food. Page and Dornenburg also suggest “flavor affinities” – triads of fitting ingredients – for each food (think “sage + pasta + walnuts”). 

I have no affiliations with the Flavor Bible and did not receive any financial compensation for recommending it. I just honestly LOVE this book and believe it could help anyone who likes to come up with their own recipes. Sometimes if I have a few foods left in the fridge, and I’m not sure what to do with them, I look each one up and see which flavor affinities they share in common, so this book has also helped me waste less.

To come up with this recipe, I used Flavor Bible to research spices and seasonings that butternut squash and cranberries share in common. The result was a delicious blend of fall flavors that my family gobbled up:

Fall Butternut Squash, Kale, and Cranberry Saute with Apple Quinoa


Photo by Gemma Evans on Unsplash

Saute Ingredients: 

1 tbs extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium butternut squash, cubed

1 1/2 inch piece of fresh ginger, minced

4 cloves of garlic, minced

1 apple, diced

5 chicken thighs

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 tbs Worcestershire sauce

1/4 tsp black pepper

1 c fresh cranberries

2 c fresh kale, chopped

1/2 c apple juice

1/4 c water

a handful of fresh sage leaves

1 tsp onion powder

1 tbs curry powder

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp nutmeg

1 tbs butter

Instant Pot quinoa ingredients:

1 tbs butter

1 c quinoa, rinsed

1 c apple juice

1/2 c water

2 tsp bouillon powder (or the appropriate amount for 1 c of water, depending on the brand. I used Orrington Farms Broth Base & Seasoning, Chicken Flavored)

Add quinoa ingredients to Instant Pot. Set Instant Pot to ‘manual high pressure’ for 1 minute. Use a 10-minute release. (If you don’t have an Instant Pot, follow stovetop instructions on your quinoa package. Adjust the liquid amount accordingly.) 

While quinoa is cooking, add olive oil to a cast iron skillet over medium heat. When pan is hot, add butternut squash and cook, stirring occasionally, until squash is beginning to soften (about 10 minutes). 

Add ginger and garlic and cook for an additional minute, stirring to keep the garlic from burning. 

Add diced apple and cook for another minute or two. Remove squash mixture from pan and set aside.

Sear chicken thighs until browned on each side, about 4 minutes per side. Add Worcestershire sauce and salt and cook for an additional minute. 

Add apple juice and water to pan, scraping the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil. 

Once mixture comes to a boil, add the black pepper, fresh cranberries, onion powder, curry powder, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Add butternut mixture back to pan.

Simmer for about six minutes, or until butternut squash is tender. Add sage leaves. butter, and kale and simmer until chicken thighs are cooked through to 165 degrees F and kale is wilted. 

Serve over quinoa. Enjoy!

From Health Food to Comfort Food: the History of the Salisbury Steak

Highlights:

  • Dr. J.H. Salisbury declared salisbury steak a health food in a late 19th century book.
  • A few years later, a woman named Elma Stuart wrote a book extolling the healing powers of Salisbury’s diet recommendations.
  • Salisbury and Stuart did not believe we should eat salisbury steak with mashed potatoes as we do today, calling them “indigestible.”
  • When Salisbury and Stuart published their books, German immigrants had already been eating a similar dish for centuries. 
  • During the 1950’s, TV dinners entered the market. One of the most popular TV dinner varieties – sold by Swanson – included salisbury steak with a side of potatoes.
  • Around the world, people in countries like Japan, Sweden, Russia, and Germany enjoy meat dishes similar to salisbury steak.
  • To cook salisbury steak, purchase ground beef raised on local farms in South Jersey.
  • Salisbury steak is surprisingly difficult to find on Jersey restaurant menus, but there are a few restaurants in our area offering the dish.

Dr. James Henry Salisbury

Before ‘low-carb diet’ entered the American vernacular, a physician from New York named Dr. James Henry Salisbury touted the benefits of eating low-fat, protein-rich foods. Salisbury believed the optimal human diet consisted of two parts meat to one part vegetable. Carbohydrate consumption, he argued, was the root cause of afflictions like heart disease, tuberculosis, and even mental illness.

But Salisbury didn’t just eschew bread and pasta. He also vilified vegetables. He even had a term for illness brought on by plant-based diets: vegetable dyspepsia. Salisbury believed we all possess “twenty meat teeth” and only “twelve vegetable teeth,” a finding he viewed as evidence favoring a protein-rich diet. In 1888, he set forth his diet recommendations in his book, The Relation of Alimentation and Disease.

Today, most people wouldn’t put the terms ‘ Salisbury steak’ and ‘health food’ in the same sentence. But, as part of his crusade against all-things-carb, Salisbury popularized the comfort food we all know today as Salisbury steak. (Notice I didn’t say invented the salisbury steak, as the dish had already been eaten around the world for centuries. More on that later.) Above all things edible, Salisbury thought beef singularly nutritious for the human body. In fact, he argued we could all stay healthy by consuming salisbury steak three times a day.

No arguments here.

Elma Stuart and the Healing Powers of Beef

In 1895, a woman named Elma Stuart published a book called, What Must I Do to Get Well? And How Can I Stay So? which advocated in favor of Salisbury’s diet recommendations. (I imagine Salisbury and Stuart as the nineteenth-century equivalent to quacks who, during late-night television infomercials, get rich by convincing desperate consumers they hold the secret cure to all that ails us.)

The recipes in Stuart’s book are divided into multiple parts. First, she offers advice “for the sick” who are already suffering. She then lists some recipes “for the seedy,” a term that referred not to trashy, bedbug-ridden motels, but to people who were “hovering on the borderland” of health and illness. Finally, Stuart addresses those who are already well and want to remain that way.

The beef recipes in Stuart’s book specify guidelines for selecting and preparing the beef used to cook Salisbury steak. Beef should be free of fat. The cow should be between the ages of four and six years when slaughtered. “Butter, pepper, salt, and mustard” should not be added until after the beef has finished cooking. Finally, the sick person can eat the beef “with a tea-spoon in his right hand and a dessert fork in his left!”

Go figure.

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash
Elma Stuart specified that, in order to provide optimal health benefit, the beef for salisbury steak should come from a cow between the ages of four and six years.

Potatoes as a Salisbury Side

Neither Salisbury nor Stuart recommend we eat salisbury steak over mashed potatoes as most people do today. In fact, Stuart calls out mashed potatoes as one of the “foolishest” menu items a person could eat – dubbing them one of the “vain imaginings that have deluded mankind” – a pretty extreme stance to have about a mashed potato. Instead, she argues, we should eat baked potatoes because they are cooked more thoroughly and are therefore more “digestible.”

Photo by Hai Nguyen on Unsplash
Stuart and Salisbury believed potatoes should be eaten baked – not mashed.

TV Dinners and Salisbury Steak

So how did our modern take on salisbury steak – rich in buttery, flour-thickened gravy and served over mashed potatoes – ever enter American kitchens? Likely, this recipe change happened when the “TV dinner” was popularized in American culture around the 1950’s. In fact, one of Swanson’s first TV dinners included Salisbury steak. Potatoes were, and remain, a cheap, easy-to-make, filling commodity. (Plus – as we all know – they’re delicious with ground beef and gravy.)

Photo by: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/14736658624
Hungry Man TV dinner. Photo by: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/14736658624

Before Salisbury and Stuart

While Salisbury and Stuart may have been the first to popularize the supposed health benefits of minced steak, they weren’t the first to introduce the dish to America – or to the world. We also have German immigrants to thank for our modern conception of salisbury steak. By the time Salisbury published his book, Germans had already been eating a similar dish called Hamburg steak – often cooked with breadcrumbs and onion – for centuries. During the 1700’s, sailors from Germany introduced Hamburg steak to Americans at their bustling New York port.

German immigrants, published in Harper’s Weekly, (New York) November 7, 1874 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

‘Salisbury’ Steak Around the World

Today, Americans aren’t the only ones who cook up salisbury-esque steak. The Japanese enjoy hambagu, a meat and gravy dish made from minced beef and pork. Swedes make pannbiff seasoned with allspice and ginger. And Russians have buttery pozharsky, which is made from ground chicken in place of beef.

Swedish pannbiff Wolfgangus Mozart [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Salisbury Steak Recipe

On busy weeknights, I like to whip up salisbury steak in a cast-iron skillet with a side of buttery mashed potatoes from our Instant Pot. I toss a bag of steamable frozen peas in the microwave and spoon the steak gravy over top. Easy-peasy.

My own salisbury steak with mashed potatoes and steamed spinach

Here’s my recipe for fast Salisbury steak:

1 tbs butter

1 onion, sliced into rings

½ tsp salt

½ tbs Worcestershire sauce

1 ½ c water

½ c milk

1 tsp bouillon (I use Better than Bouillon)

¼ tsp black pepper

¼ tsp garlic powder

3-4 tbs flour

4 prepared hamburger patties

In a cast-iron skillet, saute onion on medium-high heat until nicely browned (about 10 minutes). Add Worcestershire sauce and cook for an additional minute. Remove onions from pan and set aside.

Sear burger patties on both sides and cook until burgers reach preferred temperature. Remove from pan and set aside.

Add milk and water to pan, scraping the meaty brown bits from the bottom. Add salt, Worcestershire sauce, bouillon, black pepper, and garlic powder. Bring to a boil.

While whisking gravy, slowly add flour a half tablespoon at a time and simmer until gravy reaches desired thickness.

Add burgers and onions back to the pan and serve mixture over mashed potatoes.

Where to Buy Local Ground Beef

For extra tender Salisbury steak, purchase fresh, local beef raised in South Jersey.

Here are some places in South Jersey where you can buy local (grass-fed, if desired) beef:

7th Heaven Farm (Tabernacle)

Bringhurst Fine Meats (Berlin)

Burlington County Farmers’ Market (Moorestown, seasonal)

Hough Family Farm (Southampton)

Rastelli Market (Marlton, Deptford, and Mullica Hill)

Whole Foods Market (Marlton)

Salisbury Steak in South Jersey

Finally, if you don’t feel like cooking at all, here are a couple South Jersey restaurants that offer Salisbury steak on their menus. I wasn’t expecting to have difficulty finding local diners that serve Salisbury steak, but the dish is surprisingly rare on Jersey menus.

Maybe time for a Make Salisbury Steak Cool Again campaign?

Aunt Bertha’s Kitchen (Berlin, Oaklyn)

Marlton Diner (Marlton)

And if you’re willing to travel over the bridge, Google reviewers report that this Philadelphia restaurant offers an especially tasty Salisbury steak:

Butter’s Soul Food (Philadelphia)

If you know of any other local restaurants serving salisbury steak, please mention it in the comments below. 

Make Room for Dessert with These 9 Tantalizing Recipes

Tired of plain pumpkin pie? Me too. Give boring holiday sweets the boot. Whip up one of these mouthwatering Thanksgiving desserts instead.

Tired of plain pumpkin pie? Me too.

Last week, I posted a roundup of unique stuffing recipes. This week, we tackle Thanksgiving dessert.

Give boring holiday sweets the boot. Whip up one of these mouthwatering fall desserts instead:

If you like your pumpkin with a boozy kick…

Thanksgiving dessert recipe with bourbon
Photo by Tim Wright on Unsplash

Try Food and Wine’s Bourbon Pumpkin Pie with Pecan Streusel (I haven’t tried them myself, but Cooper River Distillers– the first legal distillery in Camden – produces a handmade, from-scratch bourbon.)

….or this French Apple Cake with Rum from Once Upon a Chef.

If you can’t wait to get in the holiday spirit…

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Photo by Food Photographer | Jennifer Pallian on Unsplash

Make this Festive Cranberry Topped Cheesecake from Taste of Home. (Remember to buy local New Jersey cranberries!)

If you don’t want to put another thing in the oven…

Banana cream pie recipe
Photo by Whitney Wright on Unsplash

Check out Taste of Home’s no-bake Old-Fashioned Banana Cream Pie.

If you love to bake from scratch…

Bake this Snickers Cake from Brown Eyed Baker. I can personally attest that this one is a HIT. It’s a lot of work, but your efforts will pay off. Even if you burn the turkey, your Thanksgiving guests will forget all about it when they taste this decadent treat. If you don’t like coffee in your desserts, don’t worry: you really can’t taste the coffee in this recipe, and it makes the cake super moist. (Buy coffee roasted in South Jersey: my favorite local coffee roaster is Harvest in Medford.)

If you want to make your dessert before the big day…

Spend Thanksgiving Eve putting together this make-ahead Cool, Creamy Chocolate Dessert from Cooking Light.

If you love a good ice cream float…

Root_Beer_Float
Arnold Gatilao [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
Drink up this Caramel Apple Float from Taste of Home.

If stuffing just isn’t enough bread for you…

Put together Bobby Flay’s Pumpkin Bread Pudding with Spicy Caramel Apple Sauce and Vanilla Bean Creme Anglaise. (Got all that? It’s a mouthful.)

If you think chocolate and orange are a match made in culinary heaven…

Try your hand at this Orange Macaron with Dark Chocolate Clementine Ganache recipe from PBS. (I’m planning to make these on Thanksgiving – my first shot at macaron-making, so wish me luck.)

And finally, if you like to keep things super simple…

Put a toothpick in some fresh cranberries and dip them in some store-made caramel dip for an easy, delicious dessert. My almost-four-year-old will be making these while I’m making the macarons. We sampled them at Murphy’s Fresh Markets recently, and we both loved them.

What sweet recipes did I miss? Comment below with your favorite Thanksgiving desserts. 

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Photo by Marie Grob on Unsplash

9 Unique Stuffing Recipes to ‘Wow’ Your Thanksgiving Guests

Can you believe Thanksgiving is less than a week away? Time to finalize your dinner menu and put together a shopping list before the big day arrives.

If you’ve been cooking the same stuffing recipe for decades, you might be ready for a change. Check out these nine stuffing recipes to wow your guests with this Thanksgiving:

If you love ciabatta bread….

dave-takisaki-494865-unsplash
Photo by Dave Takisaki on Unsplash

Check out this gourmet Ciabatta and Sausage Stuffing from Saveur.

If you like to combine sweet and savory flavors…

apple cranberry stuffing with New Jersey cranberriesTry this Apple, Onion, and Cranberry Stuffing from Eating Well. Cranberries are in season here in New Jersey, so if you’re using fresh cranberries, buy local. I know Murphy’s Fresh Markets in Medford and Shoprite in Medford both have local cranberries right now.

If you’re vegetarian or vegan…

 

Cook this Chestnut Stuffing from Vegetarian Times. I actually made this years ago, and as I recall it was a hit.

If you like Southern-style cuisine…

Consider this Cornbread Stuffing with Sausage and Collard Greens from Bon Appetit. Collard greens are still growing in South Jersey. I know Fernbrook Farms in Bordentown had collards last week when I was there.

If you don’t feel like making another side dish…

Combine your sweet potatoes and stuffing in this Sweet Potato Stuffing with Bacon and Thyme dish from Bon Appetit.

If you’re watching what you eat…

miguel-maldonado-1061979-unsplash
Photo by Miguel Maldonado on Unsplash

Whip up this healthy Whole Grain Apple Cranberry Stuffing from the Food Network.

If you can’t get enough fennel…

I love fennel, which is why I’m planning to make this Sausage and Fennel Stuffing recipe from Food and Wine.

If you love soft pretzels…

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Photo by Wesual Click on Unsplash

If you’re from the Philadelphia area, you know good soft pretzels. Go Philly style this Thanksgiving with this Soft Pretzel Stuffing from Philly Grub and Zachary’s BBQ and Soul Kitchens. Thank you to Marilyn at Philly Grub for sharing this one!

And, finally, if you like to keep things traditional…

Check out the Kitchn’s guide to classic stuffing.

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Photo by Chelsea shapouri on Unsplash

Easy Fall Sweet Potato & Chicken Bake

Whip up this easy sweet potato and chicken dish for a tasty autumn meal.

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

Easy Sweet Potato & Chicken Bake
Whip up this easy sweet potato and chicken dish for a tasty autumn dinner.

 

Sweet potato & chicken bake

1 lb. sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 in. cubes

3 leeks, roughly chopped

2 tbs. Extra-virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves, mashed

2 tbs. Lemon juice

½ tsp. CinnamonIMG_5940

1 tsp. Salt (or to taste)

¼ tsp. Black pepper

1 inch. Piece fresh ginger, minced

½ c. orange juice

1/2 tbs. Grainy, old-style mustard (I used Maille brand)

1 lb. chicken breast tenderloins

Parsley, fresh or dried (optional)

Jasmine rice

2 c. white jasmine rice

2 c. chicken broth

1 tbs. Butter

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Combine all the ingredients for the sweet potato and chicken bake in a large, oven-proof glass casserole dish. Make sure sweet potatoes and chicken are coated.

IMG_5941

Cover with aluminum foil and bake in oven for 20 minutes. Remove foil and bake another 20-25 minutes, or until sweet potatoes are soft and tender and chicken has reached an internal temperature of 165 degrees F.

Cook the rice while the sweet potatoes and chicken are baking. I used an Instant Pot for our rice, cooked at high pressure for 4 minutes with a 10-minute release time.

Sprinkle with parsley. Serve with rice.

Fernbrook Farms is one of many Community-Supported Agricultural (CSA) farms in New Jersey. Thirty-five minutes north of our home in Medford, Fernbrook is outside of the Pine Barrens. While it’s a bit of a drive, our family chose to become CSA members at Fernbrook this year for two reasons.

Fernbrook Farms (CSA) in Bordentown, NJ
Fernbrook Farms in Chesterfield (Bordentown), NJ has a CSA program and a number of hiking trails and animals for kids to see.

First, there’s a lot there for kids to do, including seeing animals like goats, sheep, chickens, and pigs, and I always bring my three-year-old son with me. Also, there are lots of scenic hiking trails, and when we go each week to pick up our farm share, we usually spend an hour or two hiking.

The diverse produce we’ve gotten at Fernbrook has always been fresh and delicious. Fernbrook provides a variety of vegetables from which we can pick each week. In fact, I think before we became CSA members, I was a bit ignorant as to how many different crops can grow in New Jersey.

Most people are familiar with Jersey tomatoes and corn, Jersey peaches, and Jersey blueberries, and other Jersey staples like cucumbers, bell peppers, and watermelon. I was surprised, though, by the high-quality kohlrabi, large variety of peppers, napa cabbage, and okra Fernbrook grows.  

Burgundy sweet potatoes and leeks
Burgundy sweet potatoes and leeks are fall crops in New Jersey.

I also didn’t know sweet potatoes came in so many varieties. Recently, we picked up ‘burgundy’ sweet potatoes and leeks as part of our farm share. The flesh inside burgundy sweet potatoes looks and tastes just like any other sweet potato (albeit maybe a tad sweeter). But the skin on the outside is a purplish color. These sweet potatoes were also much smaller than sweet potatoes we usually buy in the grocery store. I don’t know if their size is due to their variety or to the time of year.

I came up with this recipe one night when I needed to prepare a quick dinner. While it takes about 40 minutes to bake, the recipe is hands-off once you get it in the oven. I used that time to clean up the kitchen, so we’d have extra time after dinner to sit outside by our campfire with a cup of hot tea to tell ghost stories. Have I ever told you how much I love fall in South Jersey?