Where to Find the Best Off-the-Beaten-Path Restaurants in South Jersey

South Jersey doesn’t get enough attention.

When media outlets publish articles about restaurants or food events in New Jersey, they usually focus on North Jersey. In some ways, all the attention North Jersey gets is understandable. New Jersey’s northern counties are more populated, and so there are more businesses to cover. 

But South Jersey has so much to offer: a rich cultural history, a beautiful landscape, and best of all, a lot of places to get good food – if you know where to look. 

That’s why, for my latest article in Jersey Bites, I decided to write about 16 of the best off-the-beaten-path eateries in the South Jersey Pine Barrens. In the future, I’d love to write a sequel to this article, so if you know of any restaurants I didn’t cover here, please let me know in the comments below. 

Check out the list on the Jersey Bites website.  


South Jersey Family Outings: Lunch at the Red Barn Cafe & Hike at Batsto Village

Note: This article is the first in a new series called South Jersey Family Outings. I’ll combine multiple destinations into one recommended day trip idea for families who wish to explore South Jersey. 

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Delectable, eye-catching pies have made Penza’s Pies at the Red Barn Cafe famous.

Highlights:

  • Artfully-made fruit pies are Penza’s claim to fame.
  • Pies are available for purchase from 8 am – 6 pm, 7 days a week.
  • The shop also sells savory baked goods (like pepperoni bread), flowers, and produce.
  • The cafe serves breakfast and lunch from 8 am – 2 pm, 7 days a week.
  • The shop and cafe are cash-only, but an ATM is available on premises.
  • Owner Evelyn Penza and her staff are friendly and welcoming to visitors.
  • It takes about 10-15 minutes to drive from Penza’s to historic Batsto Village.
  • Batsto Village features hiking trails; a scenic lake; a museum (museum tours available Wednesday through Sunday); a Pinelands-themed gift shop; educational events; and a nature center.

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Produce and flowers are also available for purchase inside the Red Barn.

Everyone from the New York Times to the Food Network has raved about the homemade sweets at Penza’s Pies at the Red Barn Cafe on Route 206 in Hammonton. The quaint, family-owned shop is housed in a red barn where you’ll feel more like you’ve stepped into your grandmother’s kitchen than a restaurant.

Penza’s is open seven days a week from eight am to six pm for pies and flowers, but they only serve breakfast and lunch between eight am and two pm. When I was a kid, my family and I rode our bikes through Waterford and Hammonton to have breakfast at Penza’s a couple times, but I was too young to remember much of those trips. This past Sunday, my husband, son, and I headed to the Red Barn for a late lunch.IMG_5995

Set amidst forest and farmland, the shop’s old-fashioned windmill and floral displays invite drivers to stop and savor the scenery. Outside the shop sits a greenhouse. A wooden sign advertises apple cherry pie, and the colorful mums remind you that fall is, indeed, finally here. When we entered Penza’s, we saw two dining sections: an “outdoors” area in the enclosed porch, and an indoor area in the bake shop. Since the weather was chilly, we sat in the indoor section.

The shop is worth visiting for its charming rustic decor alone, both inside and outside the cafe. Even the pies on display lend an artistic touch to the setting. Old black-and-white photographs of the farm and newspaper clippings highlighting the cafe’s media coverage over the years adorn the walls. Wooden bookcases, cloth placemats, and a tiny kitchen where you can hear the waitress delivering your order to the cook create a cozy, down-home ambiance.

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Farmhouse decor lends the cafe a cozy, down-home vibe.

 

Like many families in Hammonton, owner Evelyn Penza is Italian, the descendant of a farmer who immigrated here from Sicily in the early twentieth-century. In the 1970’s, Penza and her husband began to experiment with turning the old barn into a business. By the mid-1980’s, Penza and her two sons opened Red Barn. Today, Penza owns and operates the entire operation – including the cafe and pie shop.

Still, her family helps with the shop when they can. “Although the boys have their own businesses, they are an enormous asset and help,” Penza says of her sons.

As we waited for our menus, several families came into the bake shop from out-of-town and gushed over the shop’s eye-catching pies. Behind the counter, Penza sold the pies along with instructions on how to “care for” them at home. She also sold pepperoni bread and other savory baked goods. When Penza asked one man what he wanted, he admitted he was unsure because everything looked so appealing.

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Lunch items on the cafe’s fall menu come with a side of homemade cranberry-applesauce.

The cafe’s autumn menu lists just a few items available for breakfast and lunch, including eggs, quiche, omelets, pancakes, hamburgers, soup, and grilled cheese. The cafe doesn’t have a kids’ menu, but our three-year-old gobbled down an order of peach pancakes served with a side of cranberry-apple sauce. My husband ordered grilled cheese and chicken soup, and I ate a cheeseburger with chips and salad. Our waitress informed us that the cafe is cash-only. As people who rarely carry cash, we were relieved to learn they an ATM.

Fresh dill flavored my salad as well as my husband’s soup. We both enjoyed the taste and appreciate fresh herbs in our food, and our meals were definitely homemade. I expected my salad to be the standard, uninspired iceberg-lettuce with bottled Italian dressing that a lot of diners serve as a side. I was wrong. My salad was a refreshing mix of fresh cucumbers, peppers, onions, and plenty of seasoning. We ate every bite, and since we figured our son had ingested enough sugar that day between leftover Halloween candy and pancakes, we declined a dessert course.

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The side salads at the Red Barn are full of fresh dill and flavor.

Penza’s is nestled in rural farmland, just minutes from historic Batsto Village. Batsto features numerous hiking trails, a mansion, a sawmill, a museum, a lake, and a nature center. They also host educational events throughout the year. In the fall, Batsto bustles with activity as photographers snap photos of babies discovering Batsto’s orange and yellow landscape. Throughout the season, couples beam for engagement photos beside a dam where iced-tea-brown cedar water flows beneath a wooden footbridge.

Having savored our lunches at Penza’s, we embarked on a hike at Batsto. My son learned about the Pinelands’ native wildlife and a bit about what life was like for the original inhabitants who lived in Batsto beginning in 1766. The nature center even offered some information on the legend and lore of the Jersey Devil. After seeing the mock Jersey Devil “replica” inside the nature center, we had to remind our son a few times that the Jersey Devil isn’t real (although many locals would disagree).

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Because of its idyllic landscape, Batso Village is a popular fall photography spot.

Our pace slowed as we walked back to our car and watched the sun set behind the Batsto mansion. Daylight savings time ended that weekend, and our bodies hadn’t adjusted yet. What a difference an hour can make on your circadian rhythm.

“Why we don’t come here very often?” my son – who woke up at 5:30 am that morning – inquired. (He’s definitely in the why stage of child development.)

“I don’t know,” I said. “I think we’ll start coming more often, though. Would you like to come more often?”

“Yes,” he answered.

“That sounds good to me,” I said as we drove away.